Equal Opportunity newsletter: Hispanic Heritage Month newsletter, Week One

Volunteers representing a variety of Hispanic cultures at U.S. Army Garrison Ansbach's Oct. 3, 2014, observance of National Hispanic Heritage Month close out the event by dancing with members of the audience at Katterbach Fitness Center. (U.S. Army photo by Stephen Baack, USAG Ansbach Public Affairs)

Volunteers representing a variety of Hispanic cultures at U.S. Army Garrison Ansbach’s Oct. 3, 2014, observance of National Hispanic Heritage Month close out the event by dancing with members of the audience at Katterbach Fitness Center. (U.S. Army photo by Stephen Baack, USAG Ansbach Public Affairs)

ANSBACH, Germany (Sept. 14, 2015) – National Hispanic Heritage Month begins Tuesday, Sept. 15, and the U.S. Army Garrison Ansbach Equal Opportunity Advisor has released the first of four weekly newsletters on the subject.

For the layout version of the newsletter, select HHM Newsletter Week 1 15-18 Sep.

Below is a text from the newsletter:


Energizing Our Nation’s Community

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month Sept. 15 through Oct. 15 to celebrate the contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.

America’s diversity has always been one of our nation’s greatest strengths. Hispanic Americans have long played an integral role in America’s rich culture, proud heritage, and the building of this great nation. This year’s theme invites us to reflect on Hispanic Americans’ vitality and meaningful legacy in our Nation’s cultural framework.

As World War II set in, many Latinos enlisted in the U.S. military – proportionately the largest ethnic group serving in the war.

Dr. Albert Baez, together with Paul Kirkpatrick, develops the first X-ray microscope to observe living cells. Baez’s daughter, Joan Baez, became a world-famous writer, singer, and a human rights activist.

Dr. Héctor P. García, a physician and decorated World War II veteran, founded the American G.I. Forum, an organization created to ensure that Hispanic veterans receive benefits provided under the G.I. Bill of Rights of 1944.

Macario García becomes the first Mexican national to receive a U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor, yet was refused service at the Oasis Café near his home in Texas.

For more information on this article, stay tuned for next week’s newsletter!


Hispanic Pioneers: Dr. Héctor P. García

Dr. Hector Garcia Perez (Jan. 17, 1914 – July 26, 1996) was a Mexican-American physician, surgeon, World War II veteran, civil rights advocate, and founder of the American G.I. Forum. As a result of the national prominence he earned through his work on behalf of Hispanic Americans, he was instrumental in the appointment of Mexican American and American G.I. Forum charter member Vicente T. Ximenes to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 1966, was named alternate representative to the United Nations in 1967, was appointed to the United States Commission on Civil Rights in 1968, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, in 1984, and was named to the Order of St. Gregory the Great by Pope John Paul II in 1990. In 1998 he was posthumously awarded the Aguila Azteca, Mexico’s highest award for foreigners, in a ceremony in Corpus Christi, Texas.


Did you know?

The U.S. Hispanic population now stands at more than 54.1 million, making them the nation’s second-largest racial or ethnic group. Today Hispanics make up 17 percent of the U.S. population, up from 5 percent in 1970.


Upcoming event

Hispanic Heritage observance

USAG Ansbach hosts a Hispanic Heritage Month observance Oct. 14 from noon to 1 p.m. at the Katterbach Fitness Center. Yanna Rodriguez, director of the garrison Resource Management Office, is scheduled to speak. Cultural entertainment and food will be available. This event is free and open to the public.


Visit your local library, located on Bleidorn Kaserne or Storck Barracks, to check out the vast selection of books and movies and learn more about those individuals and groups who had a large impact in the Hispanic-American Culture!


To learn more about Hispanic Americans in the U.S. Army, visit www.army.mil/hispanicamericans.

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